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PERSONAL 
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Mayola Tikaka is an Interdisciplinary Designer in-flux located somewhere in Los Angeles, CA.

Growing up in South Africa, early on he had a broad array of interests ranging from making, visual arts & a rich knowledge of hip hop leading him to producing music & artwork. Somehow what seemed to make sense was to pursue an education in architecture which he did in Africa’s and Europe’s best architecture & design instutions earning both a bachelors and masters at UCT and RCA respectively. His masters education got him engaging with art practice working with The Serpentine Galleries in London and contributing to the Het Neiuwe Instituut in Rottedam which has expanded his knack for design far beyond architecture.


During my time at the Royal college of Art my projects Moving with microfibres - looked to understand the effects that the “global toxic supply chains in clothing” had a disproportionate effect on raw material producers, makers and citizens of the global south. Supporting the insatiable consumption of the global north has burden. The methodology employed through the studio ADS3 positioned my research to Microfibre Pollution, which I saw as an indication of the consumption of clothing as they left the machine machines of consumers globally the only real solution to this problem is completely abandoning hyper consumerism. My projects looks as the spatial implication of this opening existing spaces dedicated to clothing for other potential uses both in cultural activities and alternative waste management. Democratising healthcare on the other hand was an exploration of the power of data in making a profound impact on how we perceive traditional health practitioners in South Africa. The project posits to both organise the practitioners independently from the Department of Health (which is important to many practitioners that they practice isn’t stolen by western medicine and commercialised by culture vultures) but also protect citizens through regulations in mesh networks which the practitioners use to organise their practice.

My writing reflects these interests. On the commodification of childbirth essay I look at how the industrial revolution changed the productive spaces of childbirth from homes to hopspitals subsequently excluding women from these spaces and remove their own agency to their own bodies. I related this back to the democratising healthcare project in how western medicine excluded tradional practitioners and contributes childbirth mortality because these practitioners also who were midwives in most cases were seen has witches. An act with its origins from british law that was abolished in the 18th century but somehow persisted in its colonies until the late 1990s.

2018/2020: MASTERS IN ART: ARCHITECTURE AT THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART, LONDON.

2018/2020: BERTHA FOUNDATION SCHOLAR.

2018/2020: OPPENHEIMER MEMORIAL TRUST SCHOLAR.

2013-2015 (3 YEARS): 1ST CLASS DEGREE IN ARCHITECTURE AT UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN, CAPE TOWN.

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